I just finished re-reading the Hobbit.

It’s been quite a while since I’ve read it, but it still holds a lot of magic for me. When I was really little, my mom used to sit me down with fairy tales and myths, and when I was about 4 or 5, we read the Hobbit together. I continued to read stories filled with magic and fairies and elves . . . and still do today, obviously. I doubt I would have become so enthralled with the fantastic if my mom hadn’t instilled a love of wonder and mystery in me from an early age.

Of course since I have Gianna, I think about stuff like this nowadays. She’ll probably be a fan of fantasy to some extent, but who knows? She’ll certainly grow up being surrounded by it. I mean, she was both a princess and Ary Stark at MisCon 26 and at 19 months old has already attended a couple science fiction conventions. She doesn’t really have a chance, I guess.

Fantasy will probably be her sports team.

So a few days ago, I got out my Nook, and downloaded the Lord of the Rings trilogy in one volume. I haven’t read the Lord of the Rings since the movies came out. It’s been a while. Unlike many people who have good memories, which I usually do, I tend to forget a lot of parts of stories that I read.

In terms of rereading, this is excellent. The HOBBIT was sort of fresh read for me, even though I generally knew what would happen. In terms of discussing the Hobbit with friends, it’s not so good, but I don’t care about that.

I didn’t intend to reread the entire Lord of the Rings trilogy but I guess I sort of am. I’m surprised about a few things that I’ve encountered so far and I think it’s because of seeing the movies enough times without having to reread the original story. The first thing that jumps out at me is that from the time Bilbo vanishes on Frodo’s 33rd birthday, 17 years pass before Gandalf returns.

That’s a long damn time!

I also forgot all about the Sackville-Bagginses and Frodo getting his affairs in order as “Master of Bag End” after Bilbo’s vanishing. And they spend a lot more time escaping the Shire than I ever remembered.

In the movies, it’s easy to get caught up in Elijah Wood’s youthful Frodo with his big blue eyes and desperate expressions. The novel Frodo doesn’t seem like that to me (although I loved the movie Frodo).  And in my reread, I can’t help but see Sam Gamgee as Sean Astin, but that’s fine because I really thought he did a great job as Sam Gamgee.

Anyway, so far I’m enjoying my reread of the Lord of the Rings trilogy and I’m definitely looking forward to seeing the Hobbit, even though when I see some of the dwarves in the movie, they don’t remind me of Fili and Kili and Bombur and Bofur.

Huh. Maybe in another 10 years I’ll reread the Hobbitt and Thorin is going to look, to my mind’s eye, just like the actor in the movies.

 
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